April 10th, 2014  | Tags: , ,

Ratings in depth

Design 4/5
Features3/5
Performance 2/5
Usability 3/5
Value 3/5

Budget laptops aren’t supposed to look good, but HP’s latest model bucks this trend: it’s got a stylish dotted pattern, plenty of clean curves and a simple, dark interior that’ll turn heads. The best part? It’s only £400 (about US$664, AU$717).

That money usually means cheap and nasty, but that’s not the case here. The TouchSmart’s lid is silver-coloured and is covered with little white dots that aren’t too intrusive but make this machine stand out against identikit rivals, and it’s topped off by a smart HP logo in the centre.

The good looks continue when the lid is eased open. The interior is black and glossy, with subtle silver dots lined all over the wrist-rest, and it’s paired by simple glossy bezel around the 15.6in screen. The base is ringed by a metal-effect border that tapers to a narrow front edge, it’s a neat visual trick – it makes the HP look slimmer as it hides the black plastic beneath, and it’s reminiscent of many more expensive Ultrabooks and Apple notebooks.

HP Pavilion side
The HP Pavilion TouchSmart 15-n070sa is well designed and reminiscent of the ultrabook style

The good looks are balanced with reasonable build quality. The wrist-rest is extremely sturdy, and the underside is just as strong. There’s a little give in the keyboard, but it’s not enough to disrupt typing. The screen is the only area where there’s any real weakness; its sides are sturdy thanks to a pair of hefty hinges, but the middle of the panel is noticeably weaker. This machine is 23mm thick and weighs 2.3kg – heavier than Ultrabooks, sure, but perfectly manageable.

The trackpad is sunken into the wrist-rest, and it’s coated with a rough, dimpled pattern. It’s a strange feeling since many rivals have smooth pads but it works well, indicating where the pad begins and adding some welcome grip to the surface. The two buttons aren’t as good: they’re hinged at the bottom, and so they’re easier to press at the top, but tricky further down. It’s an irritating bit of design.

Trackpad
The dimpled trackpad is quite unusual but adds good grip

The keyboard is wide enough to include a number pad, and while the rest of the layout is fine, but the action is disappointing. The Scabble-tile keys have little travel, and the actions feel cheap and wobbly. There’s just no consistency or comfort, and we wouldn’t want to use the HP for prolonged work.

The Touchsmart is all about clean corners and gentle lines, with no sharp angles, and it clasps together to make a great-looking laptop. It’s certainly better than a bevy of recent rivals: the Toshiba Satellite C50 was dark and bland, Lenovo’s G500 series is similarly uninspiring, and HP’s own Pavilion 15 ruined its decent looks with terrible build quality – not something we can say about this particular Pavilion, which isn’t perfect but still manages to feel much stronger.

In fact, the only affordable laptop we’ve seen recently to rival this machine for looks was Toshiba’s Satellite M50, which mimicked Ultrabooks with a slim, metal-effect design – but it’s also around £100 more expensive than this HP.

The £400 budget bites elsewhere, though, and it means that this system hasn’t got the best specification. The interior revolves around AMD’s A4-5000, which is a mobile part from the firm’s Kabini mobile range. It’s one of the more powerful chips from this series, but its specification doesn’t suggest it’ll be a speed demon: four cores that run at 1.5GHz with no extra boost, just 2MB of cache, and a Radeon HD 8330 graphics core clocked to a middling 497MHz.

Port selectio
The port selection isn’t a selling point

Elsewhere, there are no surprises: 4GB of memory, a bigger-than-average 1TB hard disk, 802.11n Wi-Fi and Gigabit Ethernet, with a DVD driver and an SD card reader. The port selection isn’t exactly a selling point, either – there are two USB 3 ports, a single USB 2 socket, an HDMI output and one audio jack.

That’s not much memory – even cheaper laptops tend to include 8GB these days – but the underside has a removable panel that grants access to one free memory slot, so it’s easy enough to add more. This plastic panel also exposes the wireless chip but, unusually, there’s no hard disk access.

Article source: http://www.techradar.com/us/reviews/pc-mac/laptops-portable-pcs/laptops-and-netbooks/hp-pavilion-touchsmart-15-n070sa-1240488/review?src=rss&attr=all

April 10th, 2014  | Tags:

Introduction

Budget laptops aren’t supposed to look good, but HP’s latest model bucks this trend: it’s got a stylish dotted pattern, plenty of clean curves and a simple, dark interior that’ll turn heads. The best part? It’s only £400 (about US$664, AU$717).

That money usually means cheap and nasty, but that’s not the case here. The TouchSmart’s lid is silver-coloured and is covered with little white dots that aren’t too intrusive but make this machine stand out against identikit rivals, and it’s topped off by a smart HP logo in the centre.

The good looks continue when the lid is eased open. The interior is black and glossy, with subtle silver dots lined all over the wrist-rest, and it’s paired by simple glossy bezel around the 15.6in screen. The base is ringed by a metal-effect border that tapers to a narrow front edge, it’s a neat visual trick – it makes the HP look slimmer as it hides the black plastic beneath, and it’s reminiscent of many more expensive Ultrabooks and Apple notebooks.

HP Pavilion side

The good looks are balanced with reasonable build quality. The wrist-rest is extremely sturdy, and the underside is just as strong. There’s a little give in the keyboard, but it’s not enough to disrupt typing. The screen is the only area where there’s any real weakness; its sides are sturdy thanks to a pair of hefty hinges, but the middle of the panel is noticeably weaker. This machine is 23mm thick and weighs 2.3kg – heavier than Ultrabooks, sure, but perfectly manageable.

The trackpad is sunken into the wrist-rest, and it’s coated with a rough, dimpled pattern. It’s a strange feeling since many rivals have smooth pads but it works well, indicating where the pad begins and adding some welcome grip to the surface. The two buttons aren’t as good: they’re hinged at the bottom, and so they’re easier to press at the top, but tricky further down. It’s an irritating bit of design.

Trackpad

The keyboard is wide enough to include a number pad, and while the rest of the layout is fine, but the action is disappointing. The Scabble-tile keys have little travel, and the actions feel cheap and wobbly. There’s just no consistency or comfort, and we wouldn’t want to use the HP for prolonged work.

The Touchsmart is all about clean corners and gentle lines, with no sharp angles, and it clasps together to make a great-looking laptop. It’s certainly better than a bevy of recent rivals: the Toshiba Satellite C50 was dark and bland, Lenovo’s G500 series is similarly uninspiring, and HP’s own Pavilion 15 ruined its decent looks with terrible build quality – not something we can say about this particular Pavilion, which isn’t perfect but still manages to feel much stronger.

In fact, the only affordable laptop we’ve seen recently to rival this machine for looks was Toshiba’s Satellite M50, which mimicked Ultrabooks with a slim, metal-effect design – but it’s also around £100 more expensive than this HP.

The £400 budget bites elsewhere, though, and it means that this system hasn’t got the best specification. The interior revolves around AMD’s A4-5000, which is a mobile part from the firm’s Kabini mobile range. It’s one of the more powerful chips from this series, but its specification doesn’t suggest it’ll be a speed demon: four cores that run at 1.5GHz with no extra boost, just 2MB of cache, and a Radeon HD 8330 graphics core clocked to a middling 497MHz.

Port selectio

Elsewhere, there are no surprises: 4GB of memory, a bigger-than-average 1TB hard disk, 802.11n Wi-Fi and Gigabit Ethernet, with a DVD driver and an SD card reader. The port selection isn’t exactly a selling point, either – there are two USB 3 ports, a single USB 2 socket, an HDMI output and one audio jack.

That’s not much memory – even cheaper laptops tend to include 8GB these days – but the underside has a removable panel that grants access to one free memory slot, so it’s easy enough to add more. This plastic panel also exposes the wireless chip but, unusually, there’s no hard disk access.

Performance and verdict

3DMark:
Ice Storm: 22,198
Cloud Gate: 1,938
Fire Strike: 328

Cinebench 11.5:
CPU: 1.13
GPU: Wouldn’t run

PCMark 8:
Home score high performance: 1,496
Home score power saver, no GPU: 1,329
Home battery test, high performance: 3hr 22mins
Home battery test, power saver: 4hr 35mins

Dirt 3:

Ultra Low, 1,366 x 768: 34fps/45fps
Low, 1,366 x 768: 27fps/35fps
Medium, 1,366 x 768: 21fps/24fps

Hard disk:
AS SSD sequential read: 107MB/s
AS SSD sequential write: 94MB/s

The HP’s modest AMD chip didn’t blow away our benchmarks. The HP’s Cinebench CPU score of 1.13 lags behind every other system we’ve mentioned here. It’s not an awful result, as we still had no issues using the HP for general tasks (web browsing, word processing and running Windows 8′s Start screen apps ran without complaint.

The HP scored 22,198 in 3D Mark’s Ice Storm, which is the easiest test of this benchmark suite. Again, that’s slower than every other notebook here, and in some cases significantly worse: the Toshiba M50, with its Core i5 CPU and discrete graphics card, was almost three times as quick.

The HP only caught up in the Fire Strike benchmark, which is the toughest of all three 3D Mark tests. The HP scored 328, which is poor – but it’s better than the other HP system, and the Lenovo laptop.

In real-world terms it means that it’s only worth buying this laptop if your gaming ambitions are suitably modest. We loaded DiRT 3, which is extremely scalable, and could still only manage to get a 35fps playable average at 1,366 x 768 and low quality – and this result was hampered by a poorer minimum framerate of 27fps. We only got a completely smooth gameplay experience at DiRT’s Ultra Low settings. The Toshiba, meanwhile, ran the game at High settings at 54fps.

When running in High Performance mode and in PC Mark 8′s Home battery test, the HP lasted for 3hrs 22mins – worse than the Toshiba M50, and better than the Toshiba C50. This unremarkable result was stretched out by just over an hour by turning on Power Saver mode and dimming the screen.

The HP isn’t exactly quick, but it performed better in a few other departments. The hard disk’s sequential read and write speeds of 107MB/s and 94MB/s are better than the drive in the more expensive Toshiba M50, and we had no problems with heat or noise – the modest specification means this is a cool, quiet laptop.

HP has included a touchscreen on this system, which is a boon – not all budget machines include touch-friendly panels. Elsewhere, though, there’s less to like about this screen.

Touchscreen

For starters, we’re no fans of 15.6in panels with 1,366 x 768 resolutions: it makes the screen look pixelated and there’s not enough room to comfortably have two windows side-by-side. It’s no good for 1080p movies, either.

The HP’s screen is short on quality as well as pixels. The brightness level of 188 nits is low for a laptop, and it’s paired with a high black level of 0.61 nits. That makes for a contrast ratio of just 305:1, and that means several big issues: deep blacks look more like dull greys, the high-end lacks punch, and colours throughout feel insipid.

That lifeless feeling isn’t helped by the 6,894K colour temperature, which is far too cool for our liking, and the average Delta E of 10.51 is poor. That means the colours aren’t rendered accurately, with deeper blue and purple shades in particular suffering. This screen might be OK for casual games and browsing the web, but it’s just not got the quality for any sort of work.

The HP isn’t exactly cut out for media, either. Its speakers have good volume, but they’re dominated by the tinny high-end. Songs, in particular, are drowned by their hi-hats. The mid-range is weak by comparison, and there’s just no bass.

HP’s latest Pavilion makes a good impression thanks to its attractive design, 15.6in touchscreen and low price but, get hands-on with this machine, and it’s clear where the budget has bitten. The modest AMD chip only has enough power for basic computing, and the screen and speakers don’t have the quality for anything more than light gaming or media. The keyboard, too, just isn’t good enough for serious work.

We liked

This is one of the best-looking budget laptops we’ve seen. The lid is coated with silver plastic and it’s got a stylish dotted pattern, and the colours are reversed on the inside: the wrist-rest is black with lighter dots.

The great design is helped elsewhere by the smart metal-effect border and the clean curves throughout, and it’s not too thick and heavy, especially considering the 15.6in screen. You won’t be weighed down if you carry the HP day-to-day.

AMD’s A4-series APU has enough power to handle both general computing tasks and casual gameplay, and the rest of the specification covers the budget bases, and includes a DVD writer.

Laptop

We disliked

HP’s keyboard looks like a smart Scrabble-tile unit, but it’s disappointing to use thanks to a lack of travel and an inconsistent, cheap-feeling typing action.

The screen, too, let us down: it’s got a low resolution, poor colour accuracy, and a lack of brightness and contrast leaves images and web pages looking insipid and pale.

The speakers have a prominent high-end that dominates the rest of the range to the point where we just wouldn’t want to use them for music and gaming. The rest of the specification isn’t great either: the AMD chip doesn’t have the grunt for work, and 4GB of RAM is the bare minimum these days, even for budget notebooks.

Final verdict

HP’s latest machine looks good, feels sturdy, and is easy to carry day-to-day, and its AMD APU makes it a well-rounded budget system. The poor screen, speakers and keyboard, though, mean it’s tricky to recommend this system for any sort of more intensive use – it’s only suitable for basic tasks. If you need a modest laptop and you’re concerned about its looks more than the fine details, though, you’ll be happy with this.

By Mike Jennings, TechRadar

Article source: http://www.ecoustics.com/reviews/hp-pavilion-touchsmart-15-n070sa/

April 10th, 2014  | Tags:

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Article source: http://nb.zol.com.cn/446/4460423.html

April 8th, 2014  | Tags:

HP Pavilion 15 TouchSmart (n232sa) review

The Pavilion 15 TouchSmart cost £700 when HP originally launched it at the end of 2013. But it has recently come down in price and now represents something of a bargain at just £500. (See: What’s the best budget laptop?)

It’s not, admittedly, the most portable of budget laptops – we weighed it at 2.6 kg, rather than the 2.5 kg quoted by HP, and it measures 24.7 mm thick. That’s now big and heavy even for a 15.6-inch screen model with built-in DVD drive, so the Pavilion 15 TouchSmart may be better suited to spending more of its time at home or in the office.

It’s well equipped for both work and entertainment, though. The 1366 x 768 resolution of the touch-sensitive screen would be below par if the Pavilion still cost £700, but it’s more acceptable on a £500 budget. And the bright, colourful screen provides good all-round viewing angles. It’ll certainly work well for watching streaming video, and the DVD drive means that you can plough through the latest Game Of Thrones box set without having to wait for it to appear on Netflix.

The speakers lack bass and sound tinny, but they’re fairly loud so you can watch a film or listen to some music without needing to use headphones or external speakers. However, it’s a bit odd that the Pavilion doesn’t include Bluetooth, so if you want to use a set of Bluetooth speakers you’ll need to buy a separate Bluetooth adaptor.

If you need to get some work done you’ll find that the keyboard is firm and comfortable, and there’s also a numeric keyboard for number-crunching in the office. The Pavilion 15 TouchSmart can handle a wide range of applications, thanks to an Intel Core i5 processor running at 1.6 GHz, 8 GB of memory and 750 GB of hard disk space. (See also: What’s the best laptop?)

That combination helped the Pavilion along to a score of 2874 points when running the PCMark 7 benchtest – which is about as good as you’ll get from a laptop with a hard drive. It’ll certainly be able to handle web browsing and Microsoft Office, as well as more demanding tasks such as photo or video-editing

The Pavilion 15 TouchSmart can even turn its hand to some 3D gaming, thanks to the inclusion of an nVidia GeForce GT 740M graphics card. You’re not going to get a serious gaming laptop for £500, but the Pavilion managed a comfortable 50 fps when running our Stalker gaming test, which is perfectly adequate for the occasional spot of casual gaming. Battery life is good too, as the Haswell-generation Core i5 processor assisted this laptop’s way to 5 hours and 45 minutes in our streaming video tests.

HP Pavilion 15 TouchSmart (n232sa) review

Article source: http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/reviews/laptop/3510961/hp-pavilion-15-touchsmart-n232sa-review/

April 8th, 2014  | Tags:

The tablet’s most valuable contribution to brands is the birth of sofa-commerce. So many people in the UK now graze through commerce sites to kill time while sat in front of the TV, and making purchases. Social media consumption is higher as a result too. And of course consumers are browsing for holidays or checking their bank balance, putting convenience into the hands of the consumer, which in turn reduces the cost of brands sending information in formats like paper statements or brochures.

Finally, advertising on tablets is highly effective as engagement is higher than on a desktop. This means ad targeting can be more sophisticated and innovative new formats are springing up every day. Tablet marketing has the benefits of touch, smart sensors, greater screen estate than mobile, powerful data, targeting opportunities, accountability, consumer emotional investment — meaning brands, agencies and consumers all reap the benefits.

Brands have responded with better tablet experience design, touch friendly gestures and targets. But this is only just the beginning. Our heightened emotional investment in our mobile devices— particularly tablets – is raising the bar for brands creating new touch experiences. No doubt, in the next few years the industry will see serious investment in innovative, intuitive, pixel perfect and quick tablet experiences and formats. Start your engines, the race is only just getting started.

Article source: http://www.thedrum.com/news/2014/04/08/reaction-iab-mobile-ad-spend-surge-geometry-global-jam-marin-software-maxus

April 7th, 2014  | Tags:

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ed internazionali, sportive e dei media digitali.

- FusionServ

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CONTATTACI

Article source: http://www.usignolonews.com/12440/volantino-saturn-offerte-e-sconti-fino-al-13-aprile/

April 7th, 2014  | Tags:

Laptop Deals at Best Buy Include Midrange Laptops from Asus, HP, and SonyRecently, Asus launched its new Zenbook UX302, a new thin-and-light that should further establish Asus as one of the pioneers in the Ultrabook space. In a statement, Asus’ regional head for South Asia Peter Chang said that the Zenbook UX302 is part of the company’s “elite range of products”, and that Asus will continue “enhancing (its) Ultrabook series,” among other quality offerings. The Zenbook UX302 is the first to be powered by NVIDIA GT 730M 2 GB VRAM, which should allow for faster gaming and a smoother multimedia viewing experience.

Yes, this is quite a promising laptop indeed, but anyone looking for something cheaper, probably in the midrange, could check out any one of several third-party retail sites for good deals on these devices. Here’s a look at Best Buy’s current midrange laptop offerings, which include a few from the aforementioned Asus.

The Asus 15.6-inch Touchscreen Laptop with model number Q550LF-BBI7T07 may not be an Ultrabook, but it does have some commendable specs, and comes at a competitive price of $939.99, or $60 off the regular price of $999.99. Specs include a 15.6-inch, 1920 x 1080 display, an Intel Core i7 processor backed up by 8 GB RAM, and a 1 TB hard drive, while features include Bluetooth support, HDMI output, voice recognition technology, and a backlit keyboard.

Pricing is even lower for one Asus VivoBook configuration listed among Best Buy’s laptop specials; the machine is powered by a fourth-generation Intel Core i5 chipset and 4 GB RAM, and also comes with a 500 GB hard drive and 13.3-inch display. Buyers can get the latter VivoBook for $569.99, or $30 less than the regular selling price of $599.99.

The HP Envy TouchSmart Sleekbook currently being offered by Best Buy comes with a 15.6-inch touchscreen display with 1920 x 1080 resolution, 8 GB RAM, a 750 GB hard drive, voice recognition but, as specified on the product listing, no optical drive. Still, these are solid specs to match the machine’s solid price of $699.99, which is a $100 discount off the regular price tag.

Moving down the pricing scale, buyers can also get discounts on the HP Split x2 Ultrabook 2-in-1 13.3-inch Touchscreen Laptop, which sports a 13.3-inch screen, 4 GB RAM, a 128 GB SSD, and a fourth-gen Intel Core i5 processor. Again, buyers will have to purchase a DVD or CD drive a la carte, but the good thing is that Best Buy is selling this HP notebook for $150 off – that’s a discount price of $699.99, down from the $849.99 regular price.

Last, but not the least, the Sony VAIO Flip 14A 2-in-1 14-inch Touchscreen Laptop is selling for $699.99, or $100 off the regular price of $799.99,and also comes with a more than decent set of specs, but no CD or DVD drive. These specs include a fourth-generation Intel Core i3 processor, a 14-inch Full HD (1080p, 1920 x 1080) display, 4 GB RAM, a 500 GB hard drive, and Windows 8 64-bit out of the box. Standard features such as HDMI output, voice recognition, and a backlit keyboard are also included on this particular device.

Article source: http://gadgetinsiders.com/laptop-deals-at-best-buy-include-midrange-laptops-from-asus-hp-and-sony-15466/

April 5th, 2014  | Tags:

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Article source: http://digi.163.com/14/0405/19/9P3F2JGJ001668V5.html

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April 4th, 2014  | Tags:


Federales encausan a falsificador de tarjetas de crédito

Details

Published on Friday, 04 April 2014 16:36

En horas de la tarde del jueves, un Gran Jurado federal emitió un pliego acusatorio de siete cargos contra Kafi Rhaman Farrakhan, por los delitos de falsificación y fabricación de tarjetas de crédito fraudulentas y robo de identidad agravado, según confirmó la Fiscal Federal para el Distrito de Puerto Rico, Rosa Emilia Rodríguez Vélez.

 

La aprensión del presunto falsificador fue lograda gracias a la una investigación realizada por agentes del Servicio Secreto de los Estados Unidos.
 
Kafi Rahman Farrakhan, también conocido con los alias de “Ramón Chris Manuel”, “Ramón Charlie Manuel”, “Cedric Briggs Stewart” y “Eric Shawn Fulton”, a sabiendas y con intención de defraudar, poseía un dispositivo de manipulación y codificación de tarjetas de crédito. La posesión del artefacto permitía que el acusado creara sus propias tarjetas de crédito fraudulentas, afectado el comercio interestatal e internacional.
 
Según el comunicado emitido por la Fiscalía Federal, las tarjetas de crédito fueron utilizadas en Puerto Rico con números de tarjetas de crédito emitidas por bancos localizados fuera de Puerto Rico.  Los bancos perjudicados por el fraude fueron: Wells Fargo Bank, JP Morgan Chase Bank, y Target VISA.
 
Se alega además que Rahman Farrakhan poseía de manera ilegal, información sobre la identidad de varias víctimas y varios números de tarjetas de crédito, lo que es además una violación grave.  Luego de obtener la información, el acusado supuestamente elaboró las tarjetas de crédito fraudulentas con las que pagaba estadías en diferentes hoteles y compraba artículos de lujo como bolsos de diseñador y prendas.  Supuestamente el acusado obtuvo los números de tarjetas de crédito por medio del mercado negro en el internet.
 
El acusado se enfrenta a la confiscación de bienes, entre los que se incluyen todas las tarjetas de crédito fraudulentas y los documentos de identificación falsa; un codificador de tarjetas de crédito; una computadora Hewlett Packard TouchSmart PC; una computadora portátil Hewlett Packard Pavilion dv7; un bolso de Louis Vuitton; tres bolsos de Guess y un brazalete de diamantes de Miami Beach, Glam Rock.
 
No fue precisado el monto total de las cantidades defraudadas por parte de Rahman Farrakhan y desde cuándo comenzó el esquema de fraude del sujeto.
 
Este caso está siendo procesado por el asistente del Fiscal federal de los Estados Unidos, Justin R. Martin.  Las penas máximas son de 15 años de prisión sin incluir que además se expone a entre uno y dos años adicionales por cada cargo de robo de identidad agravado.

Fuente: Cybernews

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Article source: http://www.noticias247.pr/index.php/locales/3993-federales-encausan-a-falsificador-de-tarjetas-de-credito

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